People

PEOPLE
Michael R. Wasielewski

Michael R. Wasielewski

ANSER Center Director

847-467-1423
m-wasielewski(at)northwestern.edu
Website

Prof. Michael R. Wasielewski received his Bachelor of Science (1971) and Ph.D. (1975) degrees from the University of Chicago. Following his graduate work, he was a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University. He then moved to the Argonne National Laboratory, where he rose through the ranks to become Senior Scientist and Group Leader of the Molecular Photonics Group.  In 1994, he joined the faculty of Northwestern University, where he is currently the Clare Hamilton Hall Professor of Chemistry. He served as Chair of the Chemistry Department at Northwestern from 2001-2004. He also holds an appointment as Senior Scientist in the Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne. Prof. Wasielewski was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1995, and has held numerous distinguished lectureships and fellowships. Among Prof. Wasielewski’s recent awards are the 2008 Porter Medal for Photochemistry, the 2006 James Flack Norris Award in Physical Organic Chemistry of the American Chemical Society, and the 2004 Photochemistry Research Award of the Inter-American Photochemical Society.

Michael J. Pellin

Michael J. Pellin

Deputy Director

630-252-3510
pellin(at)anl.gov
Website

Dr Pellin directs a world-class research effort in understanding the surface chemistry of materials that includes operation of the world’s most sensitive trace analysis facility. He has served as deputy director of the Argonne Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) Center, a joint collaboration with Northwestern University to develop and explore solar technologies, since 1998. His research in trace analysis techniques has led the world for the last two decades and his applications of trace analysis to cosmochemistry won the NASA competition for becoming the lead laboratory in solar wind analysis. Dr. Pellin developed a novel method for removing biological tissue without damage to neighboring cells using lasers, an innovative approach which is now utilized worldwide for a variety of surgical procedures. He developed the synthesis technique of atomic layer deposition and applied it to novel solar cell concepts and nanostructured catalytic reactors.

Dick T. Co

Dick T. Co

Director of Operations and Outreach

847-467-3396
co(at)northwestern.edu

Dick is the Director of Operations and Outreach of the ANSER Center.  Dick is responsible for the day-to-day operations of the center, the setting and implementation of ANSER’s strategic goals in conjunction with the Center leadership, and the development of partnerships with external industry and education stakeholders.

Dick obtained his Ph.D. in Chemical Physics from Harvard University as a National Science Foundation Fellow and B.S. in Chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley.

Subtask One

Molecules, Materials, and Systems for Solar Fuels

Subtask Two

Molecules, Materials, and Systems for Solar Electricity

Joseph T. Hupp

Joseph T. Hupp

Subtask 1 Leader;
Professor, Dept. of Chemistry, Northwestern University

847-491-3504
j-hupp(at)northwestern.edu
Website

Lin X. Chen

Lin X. Chen

Subtask 2 Leader;
Professor, Dept. of Chemistry, Northwestern University, and Senior Scientist, Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory

NU: 847-491-3479, ANL: 630-252-3533
lchen(at)anl.gov
Website

David Tiede

David Tiede

Subtask 1 Leader;
Senior Scientist and Group Leader, Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory

630-252-3539
tiede(at)anl.gov
Website

Tobin J. Marks

Tobin J. Marks

Subtask 2 Leader;
Professor, Dept. of Chemistry, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University

847-491-5658
t-marks(at)northwestern.edu
Website

PEOPLE
RESEARCH AREA
Victor S. Batista

Victor S. Batista

Professor, Dept. of Chemistry, Yale University

203-432-6672
victor.batista(at)yale.edu
Website

Prof. Batista’s research interests include the development and application of semiclassical and quantum dynamics methods for studies of excited state reaction dynamics and relaxation phenomena in polyatomic systems and semiconductor materials for solar-to-electric energy conversion and photocatalysis. Additionally, he is interested in the development of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics computational methods to study ligand binding interactions and reactivity in biomolecules, with emphasis on photoreceptors and water-splitting in photosystem II.

Michael Bedzyk

Michael Bedzyk

Professor, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering


bedzyk(at)northwestern.edu
Website

Professor Bedzyk is an x-ray physicist, Chair and Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Northwestern University, and Co-Director of Northwestern Synchrotron Research Center. Bedzyk received his bachelor's, M.S., and Ph.D. degrees all from State University of New York at Albany. His Ph.D. thesis was titled "X-ray standing wave analysis for bromine chemisorbed on silicon."

Gary W. Brudvig

Gary W. Brudvig

Professor, Dept. of Chemistry, Yale University

203-432-5202
gary.brudvig(at)yale.edu
Website

Research in the Brudvig research group focuses on the water oxidation chemistry of photosystem II and manganese model chemistry.  The aim of this work is to define how nature has solved the difficult problem of the efficient light-driven, four-electron oxidation of water to molecular oxygen in photosynthesis and to use the insight gained from study of the natural system to develop artificial systems that split water using sunlight. Towards this end, a variety of biochemical, biophysical and spectroscopic methods are used, including EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy and electrochemistry. This research involves close collaborations with a several other groups, especially with the group of Victor Batista (Yale) who applies state-of-art computational methods to analyze the structure and function of the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II.

Robert P.H. Chang

Robert P.H. Chang

Professor, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University

847-491-3598
r-chang(at)northwestern.edu
Website

Prof. Chang’s group is actively pursuing research in light-matter interactions at the nanoscale. This includes nanoscale materials design, modeling, synthesis, and device fabrication with applications to advanced solar cells, sensors, and displays. In addition, Chang is actively involved with STEM education by using materials science and engineering as the cross-cutting integrator for linkage to the societal needs.   

Lin X. Chen

Lin X. Chen

Professor, Dept. of Chemistry, Northwestern University, and Senior Scientist, Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory

NU: 847-491-3479, ANL: 630-252-3533
lchen(at)anl.gov
Website

Prof. Lin Chen's research interests include the molecular/material structures and motions on different temporal and spatial scales that are related to their functions in solar energy conversion, catalysis, molecular devices and enzymatic reactions using ultrafast laser spectroscopy, static and time-resolved x-ray methods, and theoretical modeling. She searches for correlations in structures, dynamics and energetics in chemical systems which provide feedbacks/guidance to synthetic works.

Robert H. Crabtree

Robert H. Crabtree

Professor, Dept. of Chemistry and Energy Sciences Institute, Yale University

203-432-3925
robert.crabtree(at)yale.edu
Website

Prof. Crabree's research interests include water oxidation and solar energy conversion, hydrogenation and hydrogen storage, and green catalytic transformations. Design and synthesis of inorganic, coordination or organometallic molecules with unusual structures and properties. These are typically catalytic properties for atom economic (green) transformations, bioinorganic relevance or utility in alternative energy strategies, such as solar energy and hydrogen storage. Molecular recognition is applied to homogeneous catalysis to obtain high selectivity. Collaborative work with the Yale Solar Group and ANSER colleagues is an essential part of the solar energy research.

Mark C. Hersam

Mark C. Hersam

Professor, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Dept. of Chemistry, Northwestern University

847-491-2696
m-hersam(at)northwestern.edu
Website

Prof. Hersam's research interests include, nanoelectronics, nanophotonics, sensors, alternative energy, catalysis, semiconductors, carbon nanotubes, graphene, organic and biological functionalization, nanolithography, and scanning probe microscopy.

Joseph T. Hupp

Joseph T. Hupp

Professor, Dept. of Chemistry, Northwestern University

847-491-3504
j-hupp(at)northwestern.edu
Website

Organic, Functional Nanoporous Polymers, Light-harvesting molecules, Inorganic, Solid State, Physical, Energy Related, Catalysis, Oxidative catalysis, Solar Fuels, Energy, Materials for storage of solar fuels, Catalysts for production of solar fuels, Molecular photovoltaics, Nanoscience, Functional nanoporous materials, Materials, Energy-related materials, Functional nanoporous materials.

Mercouri G. Kanatzidis

Mercouri G. Kanatzidis

Professor, Dept. of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Scientist, Argonne National Laboratory

847-467-1541
m-kanatzidis(at)northwestern.edu
Website

Prof. Mercouri Kanatzidis's research interests include: Inorganic chemistry, solid state and coordination chemistry of chalcogenide compounds. Design of new materials, exploratory synthesis, thermoelectric materials, nanostructured materials, intermetallics, mesoporous semiconductors, phase-change materials, conducting polymers, and  intercalation chemistry applications of new materials.

Tobin J. Marks

Tobin J. Marks

Professor, Dept. of Chemistry, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University

847-491-5658
t-marks(at)northwestern.edu
Website

The themes of Prof. Tobin Marks's research are synthetic organo-f-element and early-transition metal organometallic chemistry, polymer chemistry, materials chemistry, homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, molecule-based photonic materials, superconductivity, metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, and biological aspects of transition metal chemistry.

Alex B.F. Martinson

Alex B.F. Martinson

Assistant Chemist, Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory

630-252-7520
martinson(at)anl.gov
Website

Dr Alex Martinson's current research focuses on new routes to high efficiency solar energy utilization using affordable and earth abundant materials.  He aims to identify and exploit new surface chemistry, interfaces, and optoelectronic phenomenon that enable fundamentally new approaches to photovoltaics and solar fuels generation. Recent studies have included the use of atomic layer deposition to grow high surface area transparent and conductive photoelectrodes for application in dye-sensitized solar cells, a new route to hematite thin films for solar fuels production, and the investigation of ultrathin absorber layers (e.g. Cu2S and CZTS) for thin film photovoltaics.


James Mayer

James Mayer

Professor, Dept. of Chemistry, Yale University

203-436-9456
james.mayer(at)yale.edu

Dr. Mayer’s research interests span coordination chemistry, catalysis and electrocatalysis, bioinorganic chemistry, organometallic chemistry, physical organic chemistry, electron transfer, and reactions of nanoscale materials. His focus is on discovering and understanding new reaction chemistry, particularly redox reactions that involve the making and breaking of chemical bonds and that are relevant to biological, industrial, energy, and environmental processes.

Michael J. Pellin

Michael J. Pellin

Deputy Director

630-252-3510
pellin(at)anl.gov
Website

Dr Pellin directs a world-class research effort in understanding the surface chemistry of materials that includes operation of the world’s most sensitive trace analysis facility. He has served as deputy director of the Argonne Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) Center, a joint collaboration with Northwestern University to develop and explore solar technologies, since 1998. His research in trace analysis techniques has led the world for the last two decades and his applications of trace analysis to cosmochemistry won the NASA competition for becoming the lead laboratory in solar wind analysis. Dr. Pellin developed a novel method for removing biological tissue without damage to neighboring cells using lasers, an innovative approach which is now utilized worldwide for a variety of surgical procedures. He developed the synthesis technique of atomic layer deposition and applied it to novel solar cell concepts and nanostructured catalytic reactors.

Mark A. Ratner

Mark A. Ratner

Professor, Dept. of Chemistry, Northwestern University

847-491-5652
ratner(at)northwestern.edu
Website

Prof. Mark Ratner conducts ongoing research in seven major areas of chemistry: nonlinear optical response properties of molecules; electron transfer and molecular electronics; quantum dynamics and relaxation in condensed phase; mean-field models for extended systems, including proteins and molecular assemblies; photonics in nanoscale systems; excitons in molecule-based photovoltaics and hybrid classical/quantum representations.

George C. Schatz

George C. Schatz

Professor, Dept. of Chemistry, Northwestern University

847-491-5657
g-schatz(at)northwestern.edu
Website

Prof. Schatz's research involves theory and computation as applies to problems in nanotechnology, properties of materials, macromolecular structures and dynamics, molecular self-assembly, optics, materials physics and biophysics. He is also interested in electronic structure methods, in quantum and classical theories of dynamical processes, and in using these methods to study the reactions of molecules at interfaces.

Samuel I. Stupp

Samuel I. Stupp

Professor, Dept. of Chemistry, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Dept. of Medicine, Northwestern University

847-491-3002
s-stupp(at)northwestern.edu
Website

Research in the Stupp group is highly interdisciplinary, integrating chemistry, materials science, and medicine. The main interest of the group is the development of self- assembling organic materials, focusing on functions relevant to energy and medicine. The laboratory is currently interested on nanostructures and materials for solar photovoltaics and solar fuels, ferroelectrics for memories, regenerative medicine, and cancer therapies. The group has three different subgroups: self-assembly, solar systems, and biomaterials. Research includes molecular synthesis, characterization of structure, measurement of materials properties, cell biology, and in vivo studies of the efficacy of nanostructures and materials in medical applications.

David Tiede

David Tiede

Senior Scientist and Group Leader, Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory

630-252-3539
tiede(at)anl.gov
Website

Dr Tiede is a leading specialist in developing solar cell technology. At Argonne, he is the Photosynthesis group leader, exploring the potential for harnessing photochemical energy in natural and artificial photosynthesis. His research interests also include the use of steady-state and pulsed synchrotron X-ray scattering to visualize the structural dynamics of biological molecules and synthetic biomimetic molecular systems.

Emily A. Weiss

Emily A. Weiss

Assistant Professor, Dept. of Chemistry, Northwestern University

847-491-3095
e-weiss(at)northwestern.edu
Website

Weiss group research focuses on interfacial charge transfer between colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots) and organic molecules or coordination compounds. We synthesize new quantum dot-organic complexes to optimize interfacial electronic coupling, use various analytical methods (including 1D and 2D NMR, XPS, electron microscopy, and IR) to determine the adsorption modes and geometries of molecules on the surfaces of the quantum dots, and use time-resolved optical spectroscopies such as visible and infrared transient absorption to determine the excited state and charge transfer dynamics of these systems. We are especially interested in using quantum dots as multi-electron sensitizers for kinetically demanding processes such as reduction of CO2 to chemical fuels.

Michael R. Wasielewski

Michael R. Wasielewski

Professor, Dept. of Chemistry, Northwestern University

847-467-1423
m-wasielewski(at)northwestern.edu
Website

Prof. Michael R. Wasielewski received his Bachelor of Science (1971) and Ph.D. (1975) degrees from the University of Chicago. Following his graduate work, he was a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University. He then moved to the Argonne National Laboratory, where he rose through the ranks to become Senior Scientist and Group Leader of the Molecular Photonics Group.  In 1994, he joined the faculty of Northwestern University, where he is currently the Clare Hamilton Hall Professor of Chemistry. He served as Chair of the Chemistry Department at Northwestern from 2001-2004. He also holds an appointment as Senior Scientist in the Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne.  Prof. Wasielewski's research centers on light-driven charge transfer and transport in molecules and materials, photosynthesis, nanoscale materials for solar energy conversion, spin dynamics of multi-spin molecules, molecular materials for optoelectronics and spintronics, and time-resolved optical and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. His research has resulted in over 360 publications. Prof. Wasielewski was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1995, and has held numerous distinguished lectureships and fellowships. Among Prof. Wasielewski’s recent awards are the 2008 Porter Medal for Photochemistry, the 2006 James Flack Norris Award in Physical Organic Chemistry of the American Chemical Society, and the 2004 Photochemistry Research Award of the Inter-American Photochemical Society.

Luping Yu

Luping Yu

Professor, Dept. of Chemistry, University of Chicago

773-702-8698
lupingyu(at)uchicago.edu
Website

Research in the Yu Group focuses on interdisciplinary areas between chemistry and materials science. This includes development of new materials for energy chemistry including hydrogen storage and organic solar cells. We are also interested in development of new polymerization approaches for the synthesis of functional polymers (electro-optical polymers and biocompatible polymers), synthesis and characterizations of molecular electronic components, new surface reactivity and supramolecular assembly approaches for self-assembly of nanostructured materials and development of polymeric materials for drug-delivery applications.

Subtask One

Molecules, Materials, and Systems for Solar Fuels

Postdoctoral Research Fellows

Abhishek Banerjee

Delina Damatov

Jon Emery

Diego Fazi

Michelle Harris

Idan Hod

Neil Guan-Jhih Huang

Stephen Jensen

DongWook Kim

Ben Klahr

Matt Krzyaniak

Gihan Kwon

Lin Ma

Marek Majewski

Ryoji Mitsuhashi

Liam Palmer

Yi-Lin Wu

Ryan Young

Charlie Zhao

Graduate Students

Jason Avila

Kristen Brown

Duyen Cao

Jeffrey Chen

Rita Cook

Scott Dyar

Peijun Guo

William Hoffeditz, Subtask Coordinator

Jiyun Hong

Roman Kazantsev

Rachel Korkosz

Rebecca Lindquist, Subtask Coordinator

Jose Martinez

Jennifer Peper

Aaron Peters

Brian Phelan

Benjamin Rudshteyn

Monica So

Dimitar Shopov

Julie Thomsen, Subtask Coordinator

Adam Weingarten

Subtask Two

Molecules, Materials, and Systems for Solar Electricity

Postdoctoral Research Fellows

Alexander Dudnik

Adam Gagorik

Feng Hao

In Soo Kim

Byung Hong Lee

Sameer Patwardhan

Vladimir Roznyatovskiy

Colin van Dyck

Tiangyue Zheng

Nanjia Zhou

Graduate Students

Thomas Aldritch

Adam Ashwell

Sarah Clark

Nicholas Eastham

Sam Eaton

Kedy Edme

Thomas Fauvell

Boris Harutyunyan

Patrick Hartnett

Henry Heitzer

Nicholas Jackson, Subtask Coordinator

Nicholas Jackson

Anthony Krenselewski

Eric Latch

Matt Leonardi

Kyle Luck, Subtask Coordinator

Zhiqiang Luo

Lindsey Madison

Eric Manley, Subtask Coordinator

Eric Margulies

Krishna Matte

Katie Mauck

Tejas Shastry

Eric Smoll

Chan Myae Myae Soe

Amod Timalsina

Yilei Wu

Alumni/ae

Laura Allen

Bryon Barton

Tarun Bera

James Blakemore

Tim Brewster

Melanie Butler

Raanan Carmielli

Bridget Carsten

Hanning Chen

Pingwu Du

Brian Eckstein

Cliff Engel

Jianchang Guo

Won Sik Han

Tobias Harschneck

Zixuan Hu

Jier Huang

Shengye Jin

Steve Karlen

Chul Hoon Kim

Myung-Gil Kim

Lukas Kobr

Oleg Kontsevoi

Chung-Wei Kung

Maxwell Kushner-Lenhoff

Greg Kuzmanich

Longhua Li

Yongye Liang

Zhiwei Lin

Stephen Loser

Sylvia Lou

Michael Mara

Mayukh Mayank

Qixi Mi

Stephen Miller

Mohammed Mirmohades

Ian Murray

Jens Niklas

Meghan Orr

Matt Paquette

Shannon Pease-Dodson

Mark Peterson

Diana Profitt

Charusheela Ramanan

Shannon Riha

Brian Rolczynski

Brett Savoie

Dave Schilter

Murali Shanmugam

Yurina Shim

Leah Shoer

Ho-Jin Son

Charles Song

Erika Swartz

Jodi Szarko

Walter Salamant

Amanda Samuel

Jonathon Sarmini

Amy Scott

Amanda Smiegh

Robert Snoeberger

Hae Jung Son

Aldilene Saraiva Souza

Stacey Standridge

Mohammed Sultan

Anton Trifinov

Takao Tsumuraya

Timothy Tyler

Michael Vagnini

Brad Veldkamp

Joshua Vura Weis

Wenguang Wang

Matthias Wenninger

Vennesa Williams

Yang Yang

Angel Yanguas-Gil

Seok Min Yoon 

Benjamin Yuhas

Mahdi Zarea

Qimin Zhu

PEOPLE
CENTER RESPONSIBILITIES
Karolyn A. Godfrey

Karolyn A. Godfrey

Research Administrator

847-467-3329
k-godfrey(at)northwestern.edu

Karolyn is the Research Administrator for the ANSER Center. Karolyn manages all financial operations, personnel concerns, and proposal submissions for the ANSER Center.

Ria Hirsch

Ria Hirsch

Program Assistant

847-467-4910
r-hirsch(at)northwestern.edu

Ria is the Program Assistant for the ANSER Center.

Dick T. Co

Dick T. Co

Director of Operations and Outreach;
Research Professor of Chemistry, Northwestern University

847-467-3396
co(at)northwestern.edu

Dick is the Director of Operations and Outreach of the ANSER Center.  Dick is responsible for the day-to-day operations of the center, the setting and implementation of ANSER’s strategic goals in conjunction with the Center leadership, and the development of partnerships with external industry and education stakeholders.

He currently holds a research faculty appointment at Northwestern and is a Camille & Henry Dreyfus Environmental Chemistry Mentor.  Dick’s scholarly research is focused on the study of the interaction of light and matter to create better solutions for solar energy conversion: employing femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy and ultrafast transient absorption to investigate the photoinduced charge transfer dynamics of photocatalysts and molecular constructs on the femtosecond to picosecond timescales.

Dick obtained his Ph.D. in Chemical Physics from Harvard University as a National Science Foundation Fellow and B.S. in Chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley.

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